How To Build a Cardboard Quadcopter

Keeping with our recent all-multirotor all-the-time theme, it’s time for another how-to post! Plans are afoot, and scheming has been schemed. The flying robot skeletons have been piling up in a corner of the workshop, and after several revisions we’ve narrowed down the design to something worth sharing.

"Eventually, we'll get it right."

Maybe you want to build your own? Maybe you want to take this design and mod it for agility, weight, or style. Awesome. First, here’s the base pattern:

PaperQuadRev5BPattern.pdf
(updated on 04/15/2012)

Getting Started

First off, you’ll need some tools:

  • CNC laser cutter. In theory, you could cut these parts out with an x-acto knife, which is madness. You’ll want to borrow a laser cutter. Honestly, you should just buy one. They’re the absolute best thing in the world, and the prices are dropping very fast. Check out Hurricane Laser, for example. Or TechShop.
  • Scissors, for cutting tape.
  • Soldering iron, and solder.
  • A can of Super77 spray glue.
  • 60degree hole chamfer. Handheld is fine.

You’ll need the following build materials. For my examples, I use cardboard sheeting from ULINE.

  • Several sheets of 4mm cardboard. The thickness matters, if you change the thickness, make sure you update the tab cutouts to match. They’re 3x the thickness, or 12mm.
  • Brown paper packing tape for sealing the edges. The clear stuff doesn’t stick very well. You can also use fiber reinforced tape.
  • 4×4″x1/8″ black ABS plastic sheet. You can also use heavy card stock, sheet metal, acrylic, or aluminum bar stock.
  • No. 127 Black ESD or similar. 7”x1/8″
  • One 14oz ZipLock plastic container, or other lightweight 5″ diameter bowl.
  • Double sided copper clad PCB board, you’ll need about a 0.5×0.5″ square piece.
  • 4 paperclips.

For electronic components, you’ll need the following:

  • 4ea 22mm brushless outrunner motors. I’ve used both Cobra 1300kV and DiyDrones 850kV motors.
  • 4ea matching prop adapters for your motors and propellers.
  • 4ea regular propellers. GWS 8×3, GemFan 10×45, etc. Yes, 4ea. You’ll want extras, lots of extras. You’ll break a lot of props at first.
  • 4ea reverse propellers.
  • 4ea ESC controllers for your motors, with an on board BEC. I use 20A NextLevel controllers.
  • 20mm heatshrink, for the covering the copper clad power board. Electrical tape works too.
  • 6mm heatshink for covering connectors and wires.
  • 0.1″ spacing jumper wires, female socket. For the battery power sense line.
  • Controller board. I use the Quadrino Zoom.
  • Cable assembly for Quadrino Zoom.
  • Spread spectrum 2.4ghz transmitter and receiver. 6 channel or better. Spektrum DX6i, etc. There are 4 control channels, and 2 mode channels. You’ll need another two channels if you want to add head tracking later.
  • 2-4ea, 2000-1300mAh 3S LiPo battery. Trust me, you’ll want more than one. Your motors must match the battery voltage. I use Turnigy batteries.
  • Lipo battery charger.
  • Battery connector plug and wires. I use XT60 plugs.
  • Sparkfun Blutooth module, if you want wireless telemetry. Totally optional.
  • Nylon mesh wire sleeve. I use this to protect the motor leads from prop strikes. Also optional.

(GoogleDocs spreadsheet.)

It’s a lot of parts and pieces, it’s true. Depending on where you source things from, and how fast your shipping times are, it can take up to a month for all the parts and pieces to arrive. HobbyKing has notoriously long wait times, for example. If you care about customer service and speed, order domestic. I recommend Innov8tive Designs.

Got all your parts and pieces? Great! Let’s get started…

(**Hey, what’s with those holes in the picture? How come they’re not in the plans? Turns out the tend to cause frame failure for really hard landings, so I took ‘em out. Amazingly, it still flew after one of the arms bent…)